Amethyst and Larimar Brass Cuff

$60.00

There is only 1 item left in stock.

Rock your gemstones. Amethyst chips surround Larimar beads in this one-of-a-kind cuff created by Amy to benefit Batey Girls in the Dominican Republic. 50% of this sale goes directly towards helping women and girls escape the sex-trafficking trade.

Cuff is 1" wide and can be adjusted to fit wrist.

Made with Love in NYC.

Amethyst

Protects, purifies, provides connection and understanding.

 

In Greek, amethyst means ‘not drunken,’ named after a myth in which Bacchus dumps his wine onto a clear stone, turning it purple. The stone was a woman named Amethyst who had been turned to Quartz by Diana to protect her from tigers.  A type of Quartz, amethysts vary in color from deep to pale purple, caused by the slightest amounts of iron and aluminum.  You can find Amethyst in Brazil, Bolivia, Africa, Canada, Mexico, Russia, Europe and the U.S.A.

 

Thousands of years ago, Europeans and Egyptians created jewelry and sometimes, amulets from amethyst. We think of royalty with amethyst, and Greek and Roman societies placed great value on it. Amethyst is also said to have been set on the breastplate of the high priest of Israel, one of the stones onto which the 12 tribes of Israel were engraved.


Larimar

Supports healing, aids clarity of communication.


An active throat chakra stone, Larimar is a highly spiritual stone that works effectively within all of the chakras, from the heart through the crown. It has a distinct vibration that aids communication, and because of its heart based energy, it especially helps with speaking your emotions. It can assist in dissolving emotional barriers and releasing stored negative emotions like angry thoughts, remembered pain and other detrimental feelings that are not benefiting you. Larimar is also known as the Atlantis Stone. 


Larimar is a rare and exotic stone that is solely mined in the Dominican Republic. It is most commonly a blue stone, but can also be found in red, black, white and green. It was initially discovered early in the 1900's by a Spanish priest but never mined. In 1974 it was rediscovered in the volcano by American Peace Corps volunteers Norman Rilling and Miguel Mendez while they were working in the area. Residents used to find it on the beaches and thought that it came from the sea. Broken off pieces had been washing down the river to the sea from the volcano. The name Larimar is a combination of Miguel Mendez's daughter's name Larissa, and Mar, which is the Spanish word for sea.  


Brass

Brass is an alloy metal made of copper and zinc. Most horn instruments and zippers are made with Brass, which is chosen for its durability, dexterity and low friction.